Relevant Reads

From children's books to the latest on trauma research, this growing list of books is certainly worth your time. Clicking on each book cover will take you to Amazon.com 

When Trauma and Recovery was first published in 1992, it was hailed as a groundbreaking work. In the intervening years, Herman’s volume has changed the way we think about and treat traumatic events and trauma victims. In a new afterword, Herman chronicles the incredible response the book has elicited and explains how the issues surrounding the topic have shifted within the clinical community and the culture at large.

 

Broken Three Times is a story about child abuse in America. It begins with snapshots from a mother's abusive childhood, then fast-forwards to her family's first involvement with Connecticut protective services when her children are 11 & 10. After a brief investigation, the family's case is closed, and they aren't provided links to any ongoing supportive services. The children pass through nearly 20 placements, while their mother relapses on crack and moves from one violent relationship to the next. 

Recent events such as the clergy abuse scandal in the Catholic Church have brought the once-taboo subject of childhood sexual abuse to the forefront. But despite increasing awareness of the problem, the United States has not succeeded in establishing effective means of deterring and preventing it, leaving the children of today and tomorrow vulnerable. Hamilton proposes a comprehensive yet simple solution: eliminate the arbitrary statutes of limitation for childhood sexual abuse so that survivors past and present can get into court. 

 

Through an intensive clinical study of 40 incest victims and numerous interviews with professionals in mental health, child protection, and law enforcement, Herman develops a composite picture of the incestuous family. Reviewing the extensive research that demonstrates the validity of incest survivors' sometimes repressed and recovered memories, she challenges the rhetoric and methods of the backlash movement. 

At the heart of this story is Ruth Anne Boatwright, known simply as Bone, a bastard child who observes the world around her with a mercilessly keen perspective. When her stepfather Daddy Glen, "cold as death, mean as a snake," becomes increasingly more vicious toward her, Bone finds herself caught in a family triangle that tests the loyalty of her mother, Anney-and leads to a final, harrowing encounter from which there can be no turning back.

Former Miss America, Marilyn Van Derbur, describes, in detail, her healing process after 13 years of incest. "I wrote the book, not because I want someone to learn more about me but so readers can learn more about themselves. And so that loved ones can better understand the brutal recovery process and never again say, "just get over it." The pain ends, I promise . . . IF you do the 'work' of healing.

In simple, reassuring language, the author explains that a child's body is his or her own; that it is all right for kids to decline a friendly hug or kiss, even from someone they love; and that you can still be friends even if you don't want a hug now.

'No Means No!' is a children's picture book about an empowered little girl who has a very strong and clear voice in all issues, especially those relating to her body and personal boundaries. This book can be read to children from 3 to 9 years. It is a springboard for discussions regarding children's choices and their rights.